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An Unlikely Duo

In my time spent researching prohibition and its libations, I came across one that quite frankly has no explanation.  No one can pinpoint where the name came from.  Even the classic recipe seems like such an curious pairing of ingredients.  Usually cocktails are meant to highlight or accentuate one component and have the other ingredients work around that.  The Cameron’s Kick cocktail presents two very different spirits in equal ratios and then wraps them in flavors that create a marriage which is actually quite fortuitous.

Experimenting with how to update the cocktail, I found myself stumped for a name.  I then wound up in a conversation concerning a classic movie from the 80s.  Ferris Buller’s Day Off.  The two friends in that movie seem like such an unlikely duo.  One is a popular, quick witted and charmed young man.  The other, more of a loner on the neurotic side, constantly in turmoil with himself and his path in life.  Now there are strong opinions out there about whether this friendship is even a good match.  I would argue that similarly sharp views could be had on whether scotch and irish whiskey should be partnering in a glass.

But I digress… Let’s just make some cocktails, shall we?  I offer, as is customary in my Nouveau Prohibition project, a classic and my efforts for a redesign.

Cameron’s Kick

1.5 ounces irish whiskey
1.5 ounces scotch
.75 ounce lemon juice
.5 ounce orgeat

Add all ingredients into a shaker with ice and shake for 15 to 20 seconds. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with an orange twist.

— — —
Bueller’s Punch

1.5 ounces irish whiskey
1.5 ounces bourbon
.75 ounce lemon juice
.5 ounce pecan orgeat

Add all ingredients into a shaker with ice and shake for 15 to 20 seconds. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with an lemon twist.

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